Industrial Policy
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Securing the future of European industry & creating jobs

Eight years after the onset of the financial crisis, Europe still finds itself in a dire economic situation. Up to spring 2013 the EU was in a deep recession. What started as a transatlantic financial crisis following the bailout of the banks and revenue shortfalls, turned into a crisis of public finances, and then infected the real economy. Today most countries have still not overcome the crisis from an economic point of view. The economic crisis has left deep social scars, that have been further exacerbated through the attacks on social security systems, collective bargaining systems, pay cuts and the austerity policy.

Social exclusion is increasing and unemployment is higher than it has ever been. Almost 25m people from Helsinki to Athens are without work. Industry lost 3.8m jobs and its share in GDP fell from 20% to less than 16%. It is also a political crisis, with ever growing voter dissatisfaction with a European project that imposes austerity and dismantles the European social model. The European economy has indeed partially recovered, but this recovery is slow and geographically uneven. In this respect, the Maastricht budget criteria relating to all the austerity measures are weighing heavily on the national social protection systems.

The recovery is also fragile, as it is mainly the result of temporary favourable conditions such as low energy prices, the low rate of the euro and the ECB policy of monetary easing. Effective regulation of the financial markets has been lacking so far. On the contrary, more liberalisation is in the offing for the planned capital market union and this fosters further speculation and short-term profit interests. Moreover, the EU has to adapt its economies and societies to the structural transformations resulting from the combined forces of globalisation, climate change, an ageing society, geopolitical tensions, digitalisation, and energy transition. At the same time, it has to preserve and even strengthen its social model (individual and collective labour relations), ensuring a high level of social protection and full employment.

So in the next Congress period, the work of the Industrial Policy Committee will be very much dominated by the after-effects of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s and by the transformation brought about by global, technological and societal changes.

Avoiding long-term stagnation and creating the foundations for sustainable and economic growth that promotes employment will require an extensive agenda for investments and jobs. For industriAll European Trade Union, an industrial revival of Europe must, in addition to renouncing a liberal economic course focused uniquely on competition, be built on its main strengths: its highly skilled and committed workforce and a social model in support of participation, social dialogue and development of competences and gender balance.

The main pillars for an industrial and economic revival of Europe are:

  1. Economic policies that end austerity and put the European economy on a sustainable growth path
  2. No future without industry
  3. No industrial policy without a strong social dimension
  4. Secure, affordable, sustainable energy supply and addressing climate change
  5. A fair trade policy

Contacts

Luc Triangle

General Secretary

General Coordination

Coordination

  • Political Management/ General Strategy / Overall political responsibility
  • Decision making bodies
  • Industrial Policy
  • Sector networks: MET, Transport, Energy
  • SD MET
  • Regional coordination

Contact info

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Luis Colunga

Deputy General Secretary

Coordination

  • Industrial policy
  • Sector networks:: Basic Metals, Defence, Shipbuilding, Extractive industries, Basic materials, Mechanical engineering, ICT
  • Training & Education
  • SD Steel, SD Shipbuilding, SD Extractive industries, SD Paper, SD Electricity, SD Gas

Contact info

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Guido Nelissen

Economic Advisor

Management of

  • Economic and Industrial Policy affairs
  • Tax & trade Policy
  • Sector Policy Automotive, Rail

Contact info

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Mischa Terzyk

Policy Advisor

Management of

  • Support IP
  • Sector networks: Shipbuilding, Aerospace, Basic Metals
  • Topics: Energy, CLimate Change
  • SD's: Shipbuilding, Steel
  • Follow-up EP/EC

Contact info

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Corinna Zierold

Policy Advisor

Management of

  • Sector networks: Basic Material (Paper & Pulp), Extractive Industries, Energy
  • SD's: Paper, Extractive Industries, Gas, Electricity
  • Activities East & SE Regions

Contact info

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Laurent Zibell

Policy Advisor

Management of

  • Support IP
  • Sector networks: ICT, TCL, Defence, Digitization, Innovation / R&D
  • SD's: MET, Textile & Clothing, Tanning & Leather, Footwear
  • Working group: Whites Collar

Contact info

TOP


Michčle Sánchez-Cuenca

Admin Officer

Administration of

  • Coordination Industrial Policy
  • Sector networks: Automotive, Transport equipment, Defence
  • SD's: MET
  • Translations & proofreading EN

  Contact info

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2017
4 Jul SD Extractive Industries WG
Brussels (TBC) 
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